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it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
want to bring up quickly california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more initiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader measure that attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls sho
's its interaction of both of those things with voters. 1978 it was proposition 13 in california, which had to do with reducing state services, and an effort to reduce the size of government, and reduce taxes. that was two years before ronald reagan won the presidency. in a way it forshadowed that. but the most interesting thing about leadership is leadership can't come from the top. it has to be in response to people at the grass roots, and it's this interchange between the two that's so fascinating and works in the american system when it's working at its best. >> woodruff: we're seeing mark shield showing me there's a report in maryland, where they're still counting the votes, but it looks as if the gay marriage initiative there i? >> 51.5% for with 84% of the vote in. >> woodruff: we can also report-- and i'm reading this from the associated press wires, that even though-- well, whatever happens with paul ryan-- and it does appear he was not successful in his bid to become vice president-- he has been apparently re-elected as a congressman from the state of wisconsin. that's somethi
california to colorado, the fate of the earth -- those who are concerned about these issues are not a fringe minority. not even a silent majority. but the silenced majority, silenced by the corporate media which is why we have to take it back. and that is a critical part of all of this. demanding that the meeting opened up and provide a forum for people to speak for themselves. i want to give an example of the first day of the democratic convention in charlotte. i was going inside -- it was about to be opened and i got a text that there would be in action right outside near the convention center. it is often more interesting to be outside than in. and this bus pulls up and it has butterflies all over it. it is the undocubus and. undocumented immigrants to get out of the bus very quickly. they were inspired by the young dreamers, the high school and college students who sat in at president obama's campaign offices demanding that the dream act be passed. they risked more than a rest. they were incredibly brave. the risk deportation, often to countries that they did not even know. maybe they mo
the empire state building, seven killed at a university in oakland, california, seven dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wound at a move yee these per in aurora, colorado. and then there was this. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the -- >> congresswoman gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the pledge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> with liberty and justice for all. (cheers and applause) >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theatres don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not in favor of new pieces of legislation on guns and taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. >> reporter: but during three hours of debates devoted to domestic matters the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned, not even by the democratic incumbent. >> you'll find the rest of that segment >> brown: you'll find the rest of that segment and much more on our
and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer producti
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6